Nov 072010
 

www.pauldaviddrabble.co.uk

Saint Mary’s Church Ecclesfield also Known as “The Minster of The Moors” is the final resting place of Rev. Alexander John Scott, Chaplain and close personal friend of Admiral Lord Nelson. It was to Rev. Alexander John Scott that Nelson spoke his last words  “God and my country.”  below decks of the Flagship HMS victory at the Battle of Trafalgar. Nelson died at 16:35 on the 21 October 1805. His friend Scott lived to the age of 72 and died in 1840.

Its odd that Scott should have  been buried in Ecclesfield. He was not born in the area and didn’t live in the area. He was in Ecclesfield visiting his daughter Margaret, a well known writer of the time  who was married to the then Vicar of Ecclesfield Alfred Gatty, when he was taken ill and subsequently died. What is stranger is travel five miles  by road and under what is now a Tesco car park is where the Walker Iron Works of Masbrough was. They cast about 80 of the 105 guns carried by HMS Victory into Battle at Trafalgar. Closer still is the village of Grenoside, only two and a half miles away, where Samuel and Aaron Walker began to manufacture Iron in the early 1740s before relocating and starting in 1746 as Walker Iron Works of Masbrough.

Photographers Technical info

  • Camera Nikon D700
  • Lens Nikon 50mm f1.8
  • ISO 200
  • Aperture F8
  • Shutter 1/200
Sep 122010
 

For those of you interested by my previous posting about Lytham St Annes 1940s weekend here is a link for the ladies who may fancy in dressing in classic retro style. This lady makes some wonderfully stylish and excellent quality hats which she sells via Ebay. 1940s berets, halo hats, 1920’s style cloche hats which would be great for murder mystery weekends, vintage car rallies or amateur dramatics and even Victorian style mop caps and aprons. You might wonder why a news and public relations photographer would pick up on site like this, so here is where I have to come clean and tell you its because Aileen is actually my partner. That said her hats really are very good and to prove it here she is modelling one of her 1940’s numbers and a link to her current selection of hats for sale.

Aug 262010
 

Lytham held the first of what could turn out to be a very good annual event on the weekend of 21st and 22nd August 2010. The 1940s war weekend was a celebration to mark the 70th anniversary of the Battle of Britain and to help raise funds for a memorial to the members of the RAFs Fighter and Bomber Command which, when erected, will stand on Lytham Green where the event took place. The weekend which kicked of on Friday evening with a 1940s dance held in the park pavilion, included Re-enactors from The Northern World War Two Association who put on excellent living history displays and a battle re-enactment. There was also full size replica spitfire complete with aircrew waiting for the call to scramble, period military vehicles including a German Sd.Kfz. 251 Auf C half-track and a mini assault course for the kids.  The  period atmosphere was helped along by re-enactors from the North West Military Colletors group,  live 1940s music and dancing all in period costume during the Saturday and Sunday bringing in crowds of sightseers. The whole weekend was topped by a flypast on the Saturday by a Dakota of the type that would have dropped allied paratroops into France on D-day and Arnhem later in the war. Sundays fly past was by the last Hurricane ever built, PZ865 was finished in summer 1944, there were 14,533 of them built throughout the war. She bares the inscription ‘The Last of the Many’ on her port and starboard sides.

There is also a video report here from the weekend from Blackpool TV

Aug 092010
 

It now seems there are some possible doubts about whether the Ansel Adams glass negatives are actually by the great photographer or not. An 87 year old lady from Oakland California saw the story  on a TV news show and spotted that one of the images is almost identical to a photograph hanging on her wall. That particular photograph she believes was shot by her Uncle Earl, who was an amateur photographer living in the Fresno, California, area around the time experts say the glass negatives were made.

This turns the story into a real world example of  images becoming “Orphaned” (a situation where the creator of an image or images cant be identified) to some degree an extreme example of how orphaning can effect the perceived value of a photograph. If they are by Ansel Adams they’re worth an estimated $200 Million Dollars if they are by Uncle Earl they’re worth….. well your guess is as good as mine but you can bet good money  its significantly less than $200 million, yet they are still exactly the same photographs as they were when I posted on the 27th of July.

Full story at CNN

Jul 272010
 

While the devaluation of  images produced through modern digital photography is making it  harder and harder to earn a living as a professional photographer it seems people still value the work of  great photographers of the past.

Some old glass negatives by Ansel Adams, the legendary American photographer best known for producing stunning landscapes,  inventing the zone metering system and  founding the f64 club have  turned up in garage sale. They were thought to have been destroyed in a fire along with 5000 others back in 1937 their current estimated value $200 Million

I wonder just how many images of today’s nationally and internationally published will stand the test of time and be considered truly outstanding in 70 years time.

Full Story at CNN

Jul 212010
 

I’m just testing the water with this idea, trying to find multiple income streams seems to be the key to survival in todays photography business. So here is a small very niche market first attempt. Please take a look and tell me what you think…

By Paul David Drabble
May 012010
 

Welcome to my blog. It may seem strangely named but `tog is actually an abbreviation of photographer which occasionally gets bandied about in newsrooms up and down the country, while “owd” is the Yorkshire pronunciation of “old”. Not that I feel old but I was stuck for a title and “An owd ‘togs blog” just seemed to have a nice ring to it. So there you go….